Talk to The Soda Blasting Guy

Hi Everybody!  Welcome to my blog about soda blasting, the environmentally friendly cleaning method that uses a form of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) in place of other non-environmentally friendly, and health hazardous blasting medias like sand.

Just want to give you a heads up.  I’ll be at the Street Rod Nationals at the Kentucky Exposition Center in beautiful Louisville, Kentucky from August 1 – 4.  Stop by Booth 238 sponsored by ACE Automotive Cleaning Equipment.  I will be around to answer questions about soda blasting and share some tips, tricks, and suggestions to help you out on your projects.  I look forward to meeting you!

Thanks for reading!

The Sodablasting Guy

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Soda Blasting & Stripping Automotive Paint

Hi Everybody!  Welcome to my blog about soda blasting, the environmentally friendly cleaning method that uses a form of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) in place of other non-environmentally friendly, and health hazardous blasting medias like sand.

In my earlier postings, I explained what soda blasting is, what makes soda blasting such a unique cleaning process, some basic information on air compressors, and on soda blasting equipment. Once you understand how soda blasting works, it is much easier to appreciate why it is such an effective, and safe, cleaning method for many different types of jobs.

In my last blog posting, I talked about paint stripping in general.  Today, I want to talk about stripping automotive paint for auto repair and car restoration.

I hear a lot of people talking about “media blasting”, yet when I ask them what that means, most people have no idea…it’s just a term they heard on a TV show or read in a magazine.  “Media blasting” can mean using any type of “media” whether it is sand, soda, aluminum oxide, glass beads, or any other of the many types of “medias”.  It is a generic term.  It’s like saying “I play sports.”  Do you play professional football? Bowl in a Wednesday night beer drinking league? Compete in triathlons? Golf with your buddies on Saturday morning?  It can mean almost anything.

Soda blasting will remove automotive paint with almost no chance of harming the car.  Soda blasting will not warp body panels due to the softness of the crystal and the fact that it generates very little or no heat.  Soda blasting will not harm chrome, glass, pot metal parts like VIN plates, rubber seals or bearings.  Soda blasting does not change any subtle body contour lines.  You can vary the blasting pressure to either remove body filler or just remove the paint covering the filler.  And if you are talking about fiberglass cars, soda blasting is just about the only media that makes sense to use.

Soda blasting does not remove any of your underlying metal, so it is not aggressive enough to remove pitted rust.  So if you are restoring a car that’s been out in a farm field rusting away for 30 years, soda blasting probably isn’t the best choice.  Most people will soda blast the entire vehicle, and then deal with any rust by sanding or some other method.  In cases with heavy rust, the rusted area can be cut out and replaced.

Also, soda blasting leaves a protective coating on metal that will prohibit flash rust.  That means that if you don’t have the time to immediately prep and prime your vehicle, you do not have to worry about it rusting up.  Just keep the vehicle inside and dry, and you can go weeks without seeing any rust.

Of course, before painting, you will have to blow out any residual dust and then properly prep the car.  There is an internet myth that paint will not adhere to cars that have been soda blasted.  That’s simply not true.  As long as you properly prep the vehicle before painting, paint adhesion is not an issue.

One commonly used method is to blow out seams and crevices with compressed air, and then wash the car with a clean, dampened (not soaked) cloth, using hot soapy water.  Rinse and wring out the cloth frequently, and change the water when it gets too dirty.  After washing, use a new cloth and fresh, clean water (no soap), and go back over the car, rinsing and wring out the cloth frequently.   When you are finished, apply a metal surface etching solution and your vehicle is ready for coating.

As one old timer told me, the prep work is 90% of a good paint job.  Regardless of the paint removal method you use on your car, always take the time to properly prep the surface before painting.

Several years ago, Hot Rod magazine did a series of articles entitled “Paint & Bodywork, The Most Complete Step-By-Step Series Ever!” In the series, the Editor of Hot Rod had his personal 1969 Camaro stripped and refinished.  They had the choice of any paint stripping method available.  What method did they use on his personal car?  Soda Blasting!

I hope this helps you.  In coming posts, I’ll discuss various soda blasting applications in more detail, along with tips and ideas to help you with your cleaning project or business.  Thanks for reading!

The Sodablasting Guy